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right now. we have strengthened our ties with india. the indian prime minister paying a visit to washington in 2009 was the official state visit. we have the strategic dialogue with india. we see india as a partner for the 21st century and welcome their effort to look east and play a larger role in asia, including the indian ocean. at the same time, we of help realize indonesia's potential as a global partner. there is an excellent relationship between the prime minister and the president. it has been a terrific partnership. third line of the effort, promoting regional cooperation, peaceful resolution of disputes and adherence to human-rights and international law. at a global level, the president strongly supported making the g-20 in the international forum for economic cooperation. this brought a into global economic decision making. -- asia into global economic decision making. president obama became the first u.s. president to join the east asia summit last year in bali. he will participate again this coming week in cambodia. this stress is a critically important aspect of
of his war policy, it would not reach those people. in annual growth in india of 1%. indians understand what this order was all about. they wanted the confusion of independence. from may, 1947 is important because it is the modern 1776. america is the oldest country of the modern world. the american constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but re
interested in how you describe the evolving relationship with india and china. what do you see as the qualitative differences between india and china? you described india as a strategic partnership. china is something else. there is more of an element of competition when you describe the relationship with china. this is nothing like that when you describe the relationship with india. is it too much for us in southeast asia to expect that one day there will be a strategic partnership between the u.s. and china? >> thank you. the relationship with india is rooted in history and it is rooted in a shared system of democracy. it is a unique relationship that we are building out. it has different aspects to it. their relationship with china is more complex. we are trying to build a relationship that is important to both nations in the world between two systems that are very different. working that through it is one of the great challenges we have. we are trying to build a relationship between the u.s. and china where there are elements of competition. we are trying to build a relatio
. we have the editorial director of india today and a real star of last year's program. i expect some similar feistiness. and finally we have vice admiral paul masson, commander of the royal canadian navy. thank you for 20 s. -- paul masson. when i was thinking about our panel, i went online to find a chinese event looking at the u.s. grand strategy, there are no canadians, a japanese or americans on china's panel. we don't have any chinese with us today but we should have a lot of fun discussion not only in national strategies but evolving in the asia-pacific region with china but i wanted to acknowledge that voice was not with us today. that might give us more room to run. because we don't have a chinese voice, some years ago i went to china and visited with the ministry of foreign affairs and met the equivalent of their policy planning director. finally i could ask china with its grand strategy is. this was about 2004. i said what is their grand strategy? they said and how to keep you americans distracted in small middle east countries. that seems to be shifting. one of the interes
-- [indiscernible] >> with respect to india, he believes india is a very important player. he had very productive discussions. india plays a very important role and we look to deepen our relationship with the government of india. deputy secretary carter's efforts to look at streamlining sales between the two countries. india is a key player in the region than we look forward to build a stronger defense relationship. >> is he looking to reduce the bureaucratic hurdles between india and the u.s.? has this been going on for three or four months on that issue? >> he has been active and engaged on this issue. i do not know a specific report, but i will assure you he is working this matter very hard. let me get to louis. >> he recently had been shopping with a number of countries like australia or france, canada. since the u.s.-india deal had not gone through and indians are still waiting to get their energy, my question is, the secretary is pushing for this p.o., and we are in the second term also? >> which specific deal? >> the nuclear deal. >> we are looking at the entire u.s.-india and defense rela
. and if we don't -- india and china. and if we don't have a diversity visa, a higher percentage of the. grants will be from mexico, india, and china. that's ok, it's not the end of the world but there is value in having immigrants from across the world. there is value in having ukrainians come to this country. there is value in having ethiopians. there is value in people having diverse social backgrounds and ethnic backgrounds coming to this country to facilitate acclimation to this country. so i think that it was well thought out having the concept whereby people who don't happen to be from mexico, india, or china, or the other main countries, have a way of getting here. it's a good program. so, too, having a stem visa program is absolutely critical call. it's important to our country to make sure we retain the talent we attract to our universitys and nothing is more frustrating to me as an american and many of our stites and i talk about it frequently back home, representing both of our major state universitys in colorado, as well as private universitys in my district as well, that h
to africa, indonesia, the gulf, china, india, brazil, japan, and malaysia. the late lord mayor has been doing the same, visiting no fewer than 26 countries during his year in office. now i know there are some people who say this is not real foreign-policy, or worse still, it is just loading policy. i believe there is a race to when britain and leading from the front. i make no apology from linking britain to the fastest-growing parts of the world. i am proud of the fact that in just two years british exports of goods to brazil are up 25%, up 40%, russia up 80%. last week we took steps towards a new defense partnership with united arab emirate that could be worth more than 6 billion pounds to british industry. i want us to go further still. when i look around the world, i see countries like germany using overseas business that works to drive new business. in brazil, for example, 1700 members of the german chamber. 1700 members of the u.s. chamber's. how many does the u.k. have? just 240. we need to do all whole lot better than that. i have asked steven green, our trade minister to work a
, countries like china and india in the middle east will increase. the role that they will attempt to play is bound to increase, because debt supplies still comes from it. given the importance of the islamic world and the wealth that will accumulate in that region, there will be a continued interest in its stability. but the new security team here, what they will have to do is make a non-traditional assessment on the evolution to take place. some of this will depend on the period of 10 years to 15 years. will it be normal policy? or will the killer -- or will there be influence over what it will be? i expect that india will become a more active player in the region. >> dr. kissinger, earlier we were talking about a new country on the american foreign policy agenda. president obama is going there. something is happening. does it matter, is it important, how does it matter? >> burma has a very large population of resources being run by a military government. it is between india, china, and itself. it plays an important strategic role. china has been playing a considerable as it has not dealt
, india, indonesia, so the challenges are enormous. frankly, the strong leadership from the white house, secretary clinton, have been able to do a lot, and built on some of remarkable achievements of the previous administration, including the opening to india. i would -- those are the opportunities. for me, is challenges are the personal ones. i have a wife who is also a senior administration official, and we have young children, and try to balance, figuring out how to be in a certain place when you have got pressing either international or domestic family business is remarkably difficult. there is a letdown when you are not there in certain things, or the embarrassment when you're diplomatic interlocutor here's your daughter screaming at the top of her lungs as you are trying to sit and negotiate some aspect of an agreement. i would say, victor, i am not screaming, it is my daughter. it has happened the other way around. i would say if has been a remarkable, as you are going to each of our resume is an experiences, it has been an incredible ride pyrrhic is a wonderful thing. this is on
be proposing this tax that would hurt lower-income people the most. other countries, china, india, russia, brazil, none of them would propose that on their own citizens. it is the kind of approach that american enterprise systems not have to have on them, nor working families. >> thank you. i apologize for skipping your rebuttal the next question goes to tim kaine. you have mentioned that already. you noted president obama us plan calls for them to -- obama's plan. are you saying you would not, under any circumstance, vote for an obama budget or an obama bill that came to the senate that says we will cut the bush tax cuts and let them expire? >> i think my proposal is the right proposal. i will not vote for of bills that i know have a no chance of passing the house. you saw what happened this summer. they let the bush tax cuts expire over 250,000. full knowledge nothing would happen. the house passed their bill to make the task cuts permanent. they sent it to the senate with full knowledge it would not happen. the time for the no compromise positions is over. we need a compromise. a year
for a second this last recession, but without the economic growth for china and india. without the hundreds of millions of newly minted middle class folks. think about the last five years. rock star preaches capitalism wow. sometimes i hear myself, i just can't believe it. but commerce is real. that's what you're about here. it's real. aids is just a stopgap. commerce, -- takes more people out than aids. we need africa to become an economic power house. not just in their interest. it's in ours. it's in you are a -- your national interests in particular. we want to see the region fulfill its potential. so secure the -- queue up the drumroll -- you can if you like. enter our pro tag insist. enter the most powerful force for change on the continent. enter the strongest, loudest, clearest voice for progress. enter -- the nerd. [applause] >> yes. yes. ha ha, i did say the nerd. because it is the nerds, the floverts, the programmers that are changing the game not only here in america but in other places like africa. africa is the second largest mobile market after asia. this is the era of the afr
:00 eastern. the average new facebook is in india or indonesia right now. they are using a mobile phone primarily. in a lot of cases, there is not an infrastructure that you have in the u.s. many americans will say facebook is good for gossip and seeing what my friends are getting for lunch but if he were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story which is that facebook was providing access to news to people that had unique access to information they were not able to get otherwise and you get a much more meaty store about what facebook means to them. >> more from this facebook engineer with an insider's view of the company thanksgiving day on cspan after 12:30 p.m. eastern. at 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nasa officials pay a much to the first man to walk among, nell armstrong just before 11:00. >> defense secretary leon panetta looks at how potential budget cuts could affect the pentagon. he spoke tuesday evening at the center for new american security about the so-called fiscal cliff and defense priorities. [applause]
immigrants will be from mexico, india, and china, again if this bill passes a higher percentage of our immigrants will be from the major countries that send people here. . that's not the end of the world but there's added value in having people from all corns of the worldcom here and be part of our great country. in many cases this is the only way people from nepal or albania or ethiopia have a shot at coming to this country and succeeding. we also need people in this country across all different skill levels in our labor market. whether that labor includes toiling in the field or toiling in the downtown buildings at night or programming computers or designing aircraft, we have needs across all sectors of our economy. not -- yes, in stem, but not just in stem. so we are asked to choose. asked to choose between people with graduate degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing
it in the middle east, also china, it india. -- also india. the things that the rest of the world likes about america are movies, tv, science, technology. they're not keen on democracy as america preaches it. heading into another four years of the obama administration, where are we, and why are we here, and how do we get somewhere else? what went wrong, what is going right, and what to do about it going forward? >> first of all, i do not think that favorability ratings and the pew surveys of evidence of whether we're doing something wrong or right. i think it is a huge mistake for anybody who practices public diplomacy to think that his or her job is to win a popularity contest. well i guess maybe some of us who were in the bush administration can take a certain pleasure in effect in 2008, the favorability ratings for the united states were higher in four out of the five surveyed arab countries -- i am not even going to bring that up. [laughter] and it is a big mistake. in my view, and what i tried to do during my short tenure as undersecretary, is try to focus attention on what public diplom
there were in india last year? there was one in 2011. there have been zero since that time. we are down to three countries that have polio. that is one of the works of the gates foundation. bill is going to come out and talk for a few moments on another passion of his, which is u.s. education. he will speak here for a few moments. then we have asked david leonhardt, who is the bureau chief of "the new york times" if he will come and join bill up here on our stage and continue with an interview for a few moments. i spoke to david it ahead of time and asked him if he would do this interview. david is a pulitzer prize winner. he asked -- is there was a gates prize? i said -- no, there is not a gates price, david. i hope i didn't take too big a liberty here. in asking in to come, i have committed on behalf of the gates foundation -- when there is a gates prize, that david leonhardt will be the first recipient. [laughter] let me present bill gates. [applause] >> thank you. good afternoon. i want to talk a bit about higher education. the reason i picked that is because i think it has been a h
on a bachelor of science degree, if you're born in india, you're facing a 70-year wait, and yet this bill will not allow the traditional policy of having visas trickle down when they are unused. that's not the way the immigration system works. i believe the only reason the bill was written in this fashion is to satisfy anti-immigrant organizations who have long lobbied for reduced levels of legal immigration. in an attempt to appear more pro-immigrant, they point to a family friendly provision, but looks can be deceiving. currently a lack of green card means that a category of family-based immigrants, the spouses and minor children of u.s. permanent residents, have to wait about two years overseas before they can rejoin their families. instead of providing critical green cards to these nuclear families, the stem bill offers temporary v visas with three significant captions. the family members must spend one year overseas. unlike the original v visa created by a republican congress in 2000, the new visas prohibit family members already here from participating. and unlike the original v vis
and tensions with india. we have a real interest in trying to get afghanistan and pakistan right. second, there's a lot of discussion about american strategy in afghanistan. i think we've got a pretty sensible military strategy. john podesta and i thought we didn't have a good political strategy for getting a good electoral outcome in 2014 and get an afghanistan government that is legitimate and supported by the afghanistan people. so you have a strong government to whom to pass security responsibility for afghanistan in 2014. and we've written about that. i think that's very important, political piece between now and 2014. i think it's also very important for the administration to carry through on what it said it would do which is to leave a substantial military force on the ground in afghanistan after 2014. i'm reluctant to do that. america has sacrificed so much blood and treasure there and it is because we sacrifice so much blood and treasure is because we have to have a presence there on the ground because this cake is not going to be cooked by 2014. dwow not spend enough time focusing on
like china, germany and india. if we are going to have a thriving american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in the new technology industries of the future and i think that plays an important role. you know the obama vision was one where they thought better suited the country. and there is no question on social issues. whether it is women's health care, immigration, gay rights. there are a set of issues particularly for younger voters so, people vote very, very carefully. the economy was a dominant issue. i think that is why ultimately some people chose the president to continue the journey we are on. now quickly in terms of democracy, you know we don't know this for sure, but we could be seeing very different elections. that of that in 2010, 14, maybe 18 will be quite a bit different. the comments i made two years ago were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential year. the latino turnout was surging. president winning more of the latino votes but even winning the cuban votes. you saw young votes exceeding the turnout from four years ag
they are actually competing with kids in china and india. we must bring our standards up. i talked about career education. why have we stigmatized vocational education. there are kids who do not want to go to harvard. this should be in industries certification in a career like that. all these things matter. i will conclude by saying this frustration out there is real. from some people on my son of the aisle -- so many people on my side of the aisle, i have heard people say things i will mica in baltimore. i will focus on my family and community and the politics to others. others have suggested the american electorate has changed. i cannot believe that is true. i cannot believe that is true. if it is true, the very nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happen. i cannot believe that is true. i the most are like my parents. all the what is a job that pays them enough money so they can buy a house, take their kids on a trip every once in awhile, do something they enjoyed in life, and leave their kids better off than themselves. the problem is those jobs are not being created as fas
on c- span2. >> the average new facebook user is in india, indonesia, or brazil right now. they are using a mobile phone primarily a to access facebook because they have not had access of tour broadband laptop or pcp -- to a broad bband laptop or pc. a lot of americans tell me facebook is great for gossiping or seeing what my friends are eating for lunch. if you talk to somebody in the middle east, and maybe you would hear a different story, which is facebook provides access to news, people that had unique access to information they would not otherwise able to get. the get a unique story about what facebook means to them. >> an insider's view of the company, thanksgiving day on c- span, just after 12:30 p.m. eastern. at 2:00, chief justice john roberts and a look at the supreme court. later, space pioneers and nasa officials pay homage to the first man to walk on the moon, just before 11:00. >> "washington journal" continues. host: david walker, 1998 through 2008, the chief auditor of the united states. he is now the founder and ceo of come back america initiative. you hav
in the and and india, chicago and the condo. that speech was inspirational to me when i first read it 20 years .go the fact i the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the difference is the primary new communications technology today is different. it is not broadcast tv or cable tv or satellites. it is broadband internet. let's start with the opportunities around brought an internet. -- broadband internet. it is extraordinary. we see it here at home in the u.s. and it is no exaggeration to say high speed internet is reshaping the economy. we can hardly at imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, wikipedia. the app stores, people are using to download 100 acts a day -- apps a day. it is revolutionizing health care with remote monitoring, remote diagnostics and digital records, education, health care energy, public safety, a government performance, elections. it is already a game changer, and we are still in the early innings of this communications technology. these opportunities, where we are in the curve of the technologies and opportunities, thi
that need to be stepping up to the plate and taking on more of your responsibilities. indonesia, india, brazil, turkey, south africa, but at the same time, we also hear the statements made that as they get involved and should step up to the plate in helping to nurture democracy come to protest human rights, but that they also have to make sure there roadhouses in order. what are your thoughts on that? >> certainly, more nations now have their role to play. definitely, in our case, we're trying to play a role based on our experience. as you might know, our country just 10, 20 years ago was always mentioned with drug trafficking and corruption and. that was the case. a more important message to leave before this panel is democracy is very important. it is important when the people really want to see their relations. with what happened in colombia, in our case, very strong, important leadership for municipal leaders and, at the same time, and national will to find a role has been critical. after that, then you find international support and cooperation. in the case of colombia, it is an i
in mississippi and alabama when they are actually competing with kids in china and india. we must bring our standards up. i talked about career education. more heavy stigmatized of vocational education? there are -- why haev we stigmatized of vocational education. there are kids who do not want to go to harvard. this should be in industries certification in a career like that. all these things matter. i will conclude by saying this frustration out there is real. from some people on my son of the aisle -- so many people on my side of the aisle, i have heard people say things i will mica in baltimore. i will focus on my family and community and the politics to others. others have suggested the american electorate has changed. i cannot believe that is true. i cannot believe that is true. if it is true, the very nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happen. i cannot believe that is true. i the most are like my parents. all the what is a job that pays them enough money so they can buy a house, take their kids on a trip every once in awhile, do something they enjoyed in life, and
of facebook. >> the average new facebook user is in india or indonesia or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access facebook because they have not had access to a broad band connection. in a lot of cases there is not an infrastructure media of communications you have in the u.s. and lot of americans will leave me and say facebook is great for gossiping and to see what my friends are in for lunch, but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east, maybe, you would hear a different story -- facebook was providing access to news, people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get out otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company -- thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00 -- 2:00, chief justice john roberts. later, space pioneers and nash at -- nasa officials pay amash to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong. >> federer reserve chairman ben bernanke is in washington to negotiate a deal to avoid the so-called fiscal clef. well spea
is india, indonesia, or brazil. there are using a mobile phone to access facebook because they have not had access to the broadband laptop or pc. there isn't a infrastructure like there is in the u.s. people here will say it is good to hear updates from france. in the middle east, facebook provide updates to news and people who have any access to affirmation of and you get a story about what facebook means to them. i -- that is awesome. >> do you notice things that they behave differently like a system? they sure more pictures, less links, or ever want interests the same why? >> one interesting thing is cameras. which is something interesting thing. four billion may have access to a touch screen, a gps, a touch screen that was more powerful than what sentence to space, hopefully for a cheap price. we look at that and we say, all these people are going to have video cameras and cameras in their pockets and they will be able to have a lands and to the world that they can share with us. we look at found as being not just consumption devices but also publishing tools and that is an exciting way
traditional forms of national power. emerging powers like india and brazil are gaining clout because of their size, of course, but more the size of their economies than of their military. more about the potential of their markets than their projection of what we used to think of as power. meanwhile, the global economic system, open, free, transparent, and fair, that fueled unprecedented growth is now under unprecedented pressure. trade imbalances, new forms of protectionism, the rise of state capitalism, and crippling public debt. finally, the traditional sources of america's global leadership are in need of renewal. a task for all of us. the cottage industry of cassandras and declinists have dramatically overstated this case, but it is true that the reservoirs of good will that we build up around the world during the 20th century will not and cannot last forever. new generations of young people do not remember gi's liberating their countries, or american development assistance changing the face of their economies were literally saving generations from hunger and disease. they are mo
of victories in india, particularly around corruption campaigns. individual officers requesting bribes are being exposed and given center. -- censure. the magnitude of needed improvement of justice is much greater internationally than in the united states. >> to you capture information of people? >> at most, the post code or zip code. then, we are able to target people. >> do you find somebody else who wants to do an environmental petition? >> just like with amazon, if someone is interested, we personalize recommendations for campaigns. >> to the campaigns by that from you? >> no. people can campaign to sponsor campaigns. if you are featured on the site, it is a sponsor petition. >> we see you signed for petitions on recycling. here is one that might be interesting. >> absolutely. >> have you discovered a class of people that are habitual sex who has signed the most petitions? -- who are habitual? who has signed the most petitions? >> thousands. some people go crazy. the increase in likelihood of signing a petition after experiencing a victory. historically, there has not been a lot of
, india or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access it because they haven't had an access to a broadband p.c. or laptop. there isn't an infrastructure of media that you have in the u.s. so a lot of americans will meet me and say facebook is combreat for gossiping and see what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you were to talk to somebody in the middle east you'd hear a different story which is that facebook was providing access to news to people that had unique access to information that they weren't able to get it otherwise and you get a much more sort of meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> more from facebook engineer chris cox with an insider's view of the company, thanksgiving day on c-span. at 12:00 chief justice john roberts and at 10:ooh, we pay tribute to neil armstrong just before 11:00. >> live coverage here tomorrow on c-span. we'll look at immigration policy at the american enterprise institute. speakers include richard lamb of the sournl baptist convention. that's at sock a.m. eastern. then the c.e.o. of the new york stock exchange
carolina was the only that -- battleground state. >> india was not even contested this time. north carolina was the only one. >> florida is still out. this year turned out to be irrelevant as opposed to other years. what did the republicans miss when they were looking at this electric? >> bemis anybody, practically anybody who was brown or black. bemis practically anybody who believes that immigration is an issue that needs to be tackled. you had a case here where the republican party right now is stampeding toward irrelevance. if they do not catch up with everything in the national journal, there is changing demographics. you cannot have a ruling coalition that is virtually all white. you had president obama yesterday put together this new ascendant coalition, put it back together from 2008 and enough of the democratic coalition so you have this combination of hispanics, more than 70% of hispanics, young voters, people who both want to twice as a democrat. they're likely to remain a dealt crack -- democrat. republicans, what they're missing is the idea of trying to expand their percentage
on the other. states like that -- north korea, pakistan, india, i guess the argument could be made to a certain degree, israel. they are driven to an extent -- certainly by profound insecurity and the notion, which is elevated to a level of one of the 10 commandments in this time, that the way to really get iran is getting rid of -- and it also generates paradoxical implications that the more threatened -- if assad's fall and sense of encirclement and the besieged quality of ron's neighborhood -- simple -- you ron's neighborhood, a simple man that i am, is going to accelerate program,clear weapons and not make them more reasonable. this is a conclusion that is impossible to attack or unwind, and yet it is obviously critical to the discussion of what to do. >> i think the dilemma to the outside world is do we have the talent, the skill to persuade iranian leaders that the acquisition of nuclear materials is secure? there are those who would make the argument that aaron is making. if you look at world experience in the 20th century, having nuclear weapons is a status symbol and literally a deterr
. after all it's less expensive to live in india where the stars of the movie end up going. i'm here to talk about an at native to youth nation i can't or out sourcing what soon will be a quarter of the population and to argue that the solution to much that ails us as individuals and as a society lace in rethinking the map of life. a map of life that was in many ways set up for three score and ten for those who seem like longer lives of the past century but is inadequate of five score life spans that more people will be living in the 21st century. half of the kids in the developed rgp world are projected to see their 100th birthday. so we can't just extend this life course that was set up for a very different ark of life to one that is really -- has an extra decimal point and and extra 0 to it. so i think what is happening is today that the nature of life is under every bit as radical a transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we're so familiar with. and that the period that's been characterized in these terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the
in places like china and india. the sooner we can have substitute fuels -- in the immediate future that is natural gas. we have to be careful how it is extracted, and it can be extracted safely. it can be an enormous advantage to us. i was on a bus in portland that was powered by compressed natural gas. we can use it to power electric vehicles. there should be a parallel track developing renewables to be there when the gas it runs out or demand increases to the point where the price goes up. to power your vehicle on natural gas is the equivalent of $2 a gallon. it will be the same with home heating. getting off of oil should be the number one priority. >> senator dill? >> thank you. gas prices are a challenge to anyone in maine trying to take their kids to school or get groceries or go to work. i support the fuel efficiency standards that will lead to automobiles to rely on less fuel and will cost families less money. i am the only candidate in the race who opposes the keystone pipeline. i do not believe transporting tar sands is the way to get off of oil. i am opposed to fracking.
the site. groups that did not have much online activity -- india is a great example. immense numbers of victories in india, particularly around corruption campaigns. individual officers requesting bribes are being exposed and given censure. the magnitude of needed improvement of justice is much greater internationally than in the united states. >> do you capture information from people? >> at most, the post code or zip code. then, we are able to target people. >> do you find somebody else who wants to do an environmental petition? >> just like with amazon, if someone is interested, we personalize recommendations for campaigns. >> do the campaigns buy that from you? >> no. people can pay to sponsor campaigns. if you are featured on the site, it is a sponsored petition. >> we see you you signed petitions on recycling. here is one that might be interesting. >> absolutely. >> have you discovered a class of people that are habitual? who has signed the most petitions? >> thousands. some people go crazy. the increase in likelihood of signing a petition is after experiencing a victory. histo
and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential lecktorts. and the comments i made were predicated on what we thought would happen in a presidential election. you had latinos turning out. the president won the cuban vote. the fir
else and after all, it's less expensive to live in places like india where the stars in the movie end up gone. i am here today to talk about an alternative to either euthanasia or outsourcing, what soon will be a quarter of the population, and argue that the solution to much ails us as individuals in a society lays in rethinking the map of life, the map of life that was in many ways set up in three score and 10, which seems like a longer lives of the past century but is inadequate to the five score lifespans that more and more people will be living in the 21st century. half the kids born since 2000 the developed world are projected to see their 100th birthday so we can't just fold, spindle, made late stretch and extend this life course that really was set up for a very different arc of life to one that is really, has an extra decibel point, an extra zero to it. so i think what is happening, to really cut to the essence of what i'm saying today is that the nature of life is under every bed a radical transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we are so familiar with and t
.s. is in decline and china is in the rise or india or something, have a look at what those countries like china and the problems they have every day. ask yourself where you would like to exchange and boxes. i doubt it very much. finally, i will share some insight i gained from living in the western part of the united states. our country will become energy self-sufficient at some point. i am not saying it will happen tomorrow. that will be a huge game changer. what has been described as our achilles' heel for years and years, this notion of this declining and weak u.s. economy, even that will be changing. when you hear a country like japan looking at off the table type of demographics or japan which is now gone from 128 million people has gone down. we're looking at 70 million people in our children's lifetime. japan is foreswear nuclear energy because of last year's catastrophe. the look at the united states. we are going to be a very big player for years to come for a lot are reasons, including our economy. i think it is a good time to look at this. we are not in any kind of declining mode. we
north dakota where you can just show up to the polls and you can vote. in india and a, you have to show a government issued a voter and of -- in indiana, you have to show a government issued an order of a vacation before you can what voters need to know this -- of voter identification before you can vote. voters need to know what is required of them before they go to vote. you can call your state or local election officials or look at the website of your stay. it is important for voters to know what type of identification is required at the polls. is important for poll workers to know and to ask for the identification or, where ideas not required, to not ask for it. a -- where an id is not required, to not ask for it. host: here is an interesting article. if all or on twitter says, what about the u.n. watchers that have been followed with threats of arrest? who are they and what are they here? -- why are they here? guest: they have come to elections in the last 20 years and moderate them. to be clear in terms of what they actually do the polls now, they are not trying to intervene in an
. host: that was india in illinois. this is rolando in the brothels, texas. good morning. calling at an independent. i registered as a democrat, but i am an independent. the american people did the right thing. the american people rejected the idea that our government could only focus on the large and gritty corporations. -- agreed corporations. those corporations ship those jobs out of the united states and they just want a tax cut helping them. i think americans rejected the notion and also the idea that we can have responsible capitalism. capitalism is great, but we also need the social safety net that is provided for us just just ine capitalism runs rampant and leaves us at the wayside. i think the american people did the right thing. whites, blacks, latinos, the agents -- asians, they are educated and they are down. and for everybody that things latinos are just about immigration, nokomis we are working class. -- no, we are working class. we are teachers, businessmen, entrepreneurs. we care about this nation more than anyone -- more than anything else as well. we want the nat
in a box. it was not china, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as it basically its backyard forest to cut down. point, the caller's every product that he described there would be a lot more expensive if not for china. he touches on some very important which was the implications of what nafta meant and what globalization more broadly means when it not well articulated by president clinton or subsequent presidents. president bush wanted a hemisphere-wide free trade summit. it is very dislocated, particularly on
, it would be india and countries in africa. it already is making products that are either american in concept or are just completely international products. host: scott, let me add this to the mix -- the reporter notes that this will presumably not be much appreciated by beijing. guest: burma is a place that china perceives as in its sphere of influence. particularly as a place to get the resources it needs. timber along the borders, oil. there has been a backlash inside burma which is why we saw political reform their last year which is the reason the president is going, against china. in the way it treats burma as basically its backyard forest to cut down. back to the caller's point, every product that he described there would be a lot more expensive if not for china. he touches on some very important which was the implications of what nafta meant and what globalization more broadly means when it not well articulated by president clinton or subsequent presidents. president bush wanted a hemisphere-wide free trade summit. it is very dislocated, particularly on american manufacturi
this last global recession but without the economic growth of china and india, without hundreds of millions of newly minted middle- class folks who now buy american and european goods. imagine that. think about the last five years. rocks are preaches capitalism. well. sometimes i hear myself and i cannot believe it. commerce is a real pure that is what you're about. commerce, entrepreneurial capitalism takes more people out of poverty than aids. we know that. we need africa to become an economic powerhouse. it is not just in their interest. it is in our national security interest, too. we want to see the region to fill its potential. q uueque up the drum roll. you can if you like. enter our protagonist. enter the most powerful force for change on the continent. enter the loudest voice for progress. enter the nerd. [applause] [laughter] yes. .yes. i did say "the nerd." it is the nerds, the elevators that are changing the game not only here in america but even more in places like africa which are more mobile than we are. africa is the second-largest mobile market after asia. this is the era o
against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. wh
for the steering group. >> the average new facebook user is in india or brazil right now. they're using a mobile phone to access it because they don't have access to a laptop or p.c. the a lot of americans will meet me and say oh, facebook is great for gossiping and seeing why -- what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you were to talk to? the middle east, say, you would hear a different story, which is that facebook is providing news to people who had unique access to information that they weren't able to get otherwise. you get i much more smeat -- meaty story about what facebook means to them. >> more from chris fox thanksgiving day on c-span. at 2:00, justice john roberts and a look into the supreme court. later, space pioneers and nasa officials pay homage to the first man to walk on the moon, neil armstrong, just before 11. now a look at the prospects for immigration, trade, and drug policies in the second term of the obama administration. panelists talk about the administration's approach to and cooperation with latin america. this is just over an hour. >> this morning we're going hav
delhi, and relationship between pakistan, afghanistan, and india? >> at this point, i don't have insight into what the government is doing. i am certainly aware that it will be critical, and if confirmed, i suspect i will be involved in that issue. >> speak to the announcement that pakistan will release low- level prisoners at the request of the government. does this suggest we can work towards a negotiated settlement? or do you think that there is no path between the government and the taliban without pakistan? >> i would support any initiative that would bring a political resolution to the conflict in afghanistan. i know that our special representative is working very hard to affect some reconciliation. if confirmed, i would be supporting the ambassadors efforts of reconciliation. i don't have a sense for the probability of reconciliation in the near term, but i would look forward to supporting embassador grossman. >> i look forward to seeing you in theater as we bring this war to a successful conclusion. >> i would like to associate myself with senator cain's comments. thank you for b
with children in mississippi and alabama when they're actually competing with kids in china and india. we must raise our standard. why have we stigmatized vocational education? why have we stigmatized career education? there are kids who don't want to go to harvard. one depicts airplane engines. it's a good paying job that god has given them the talent to do. -- they want to fix airplane engines. and college affordability i have touched upon, and adult education is important. all these things matter. i conclude by saying frustration is real. so many people on my side of the aisle and my party and the governor's party. a lot of frustration about the outcome of the elections. i have heard people say i'm not getting involved anymore, i will just focus on my family and my community and leave politics to others. others have suggested maybe the american electorate has changed, that what people want from government now is they will vote for whoever promises them more. i don't believe that's true. i cannot believe that's true. if it were, the nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happ
face the accuser is in india or indonesia right now. they're using a mobile phone primarily to access the facebook. in a lot of cases, there is not an infrastructure of media and communications that you have in the u.s. and a lot of americans will meet you and say facebook is great for gossip and seeing what my friends are eating for lunch. but if you talk to somebody and the middle east, you would hear a different story which is that facebook is providing access to news, to people that had unique access to information that they were not able to get otherwise. you get a much more meaty story about what is the means to them. and that is awesome. >> but did you notice things that they actually behave differently with the system? like they share more pictures versus texts? or does basically everyone interact on facebook in the same way? >> one interesting thing is the cameras. a lot of people getting a smart phone for the first time will also have gotten their first camera. that is interesting to the about. if we are about to have four billion smart phones in 2017, that means four millio
foreign competition in china and india getting ahead of us. is the model we have in place for teaching our kids that was built in the industrial age sufficient for the information age? is the curriculum in place sufficient for the 21st century to develop new businesses to bring the economy forward? >> that is a softball question. [laughter] no. when we built as education system, summers were also taken work on farms. it was a compromise with farmers. that is why we have the schedule. when we put that system in place, there were no cars, planes, were electric lights. computers, on and on. the bottom line is we have an over allegiance to the system based on the stock to a. -- based on nostalgia. my mother went to the school. my grandmother went to the school. you cannot close the school. 95% students were failing and parents were still fighting for the school. i ask them and they said, my grandmother went to the school. i would say, the grandmother passed? your kids are not passing. [laughter] i believe in sentimentality, nostalgic, and preserving neighborhood icons. if you are failing 95% o
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